Test de inglés

Test de inglés

Instructions:

Questions 1-10: Read the information and choose the correct answer, A, B or C.

Questions 11-16: Read the text about a young racing drive. For questions 11-16, answer A, B, or C. Choose only one answer for each question.

Questions 17-40: For questions 17-40, answer A, B, C or D. Choose only one answer for each question.

1. __________ your English teacher from? Is he from the UK?

 
 
 

2. I have two addresses. One address is with my parents. _______ house is in a beautiful part of Italy.

 
 
 

3. We never have pizza at home- my mother and my father _______ like it, so I eat it in restaurants.

 
 
 

4. Please leave your keys in Reception

 
 
 

5. Take one with water before meals

 
 
 

6. Hillside Beach – To protect animals, please take all your rubbish home

 
 
 

7. The 9.15 train to York will now leave platform 3 at 9.55. Passengers with reservations should board the train no later than 9.50

 
 
 

8. Please take note that the meeting scheduled to be held in this room at 14.00 will now take place in Room 17

 
 
 

9. STUDENT’S COOKBOOK
A beginner in the kitchen?
This will help you. You may find the recipes need time, but they are very easy to follow – and cheap!

 
 
 

10. Do not write in this space

 
 
 

11. Racing Driver
Carrie Wilson became a racing driver when she was six years old. She was given a radio-controlled car for her birthday. She entered competitions with it and finished second in a national championship the following year. She was proud that she was winning races against adults. She loved the excitement of travelling to events, and her father thought that she had a natural talent for motor sport.
The next thing Carrie tried was racing go – karts – miniature cars with engines. She was given a go-kart for her eighth birthday and she won races in different countries. On her tenth birthday, she was given a picture of the famous Brazilian 1970s Formula One champion Emerson Fittipaldi and told her parents, ‘One day I want to drive as fast as him’.
Carrie’s parents said they would support her racing career as long as she worked hard at school. She was good at most sports, and represented her school as a basketball player. Her teachers said she was a born champion. She spent every spare minute at competitions or sports training, so it wasn’t easy for her to do her homework, but she managed to make some progress in most subjects.
When she was seventeen Carrie moved on to full-size racing cars. Although it was clear that she was going to have a great future in the sport as a professional driver, she would need to have some help with money if she wanted to continue in the long term. When she left school, her father gave up his job so that he could train her. Before long, Carrie started winning championships and one team called her with an offer, but she decided she wasn’t ready.
Carrie is only 23, but is becoming well know. The cars she drives are getting faster, and she’s competing against people who have been driving much longer than her. She makes money from her successes, and her father is now her full-time manager. She needs him to look after her in a tough profession.
In spite of her success, Carrie admits she still has a lot to do. ‘I watch the great drivers, and read about them’, she says. ‘Some people blame the car if they lose a race, but I know for me it’s usually because I do something wrong. When I make mistakes, I think about them and discuss them with my trainer. That’s the only way forward.’.
When Carrie Wilson took part in competitions for radio-controlled cars,

 
 
 

12. Racing Driver
Carrie Wilson became a racing driver when she was six years old. She was given a radio-controlled car for her birthday. She entered competitions with it and finished second in a national championship the following year. She was proud that she was winning races against adults. She loved the excitement of travelling to events, and her father thought that she had a natural talent for motor sport.
The next thing Carrie tried was racing go – karts – miniature cars with engines. She was given a go-kart for her eighth birthday and she won races in different countries. On her tenth birthday, she was given a picture of the famous Brazilian 1970s Formula One champion Emerson Fittipaldi and told her parents, ‘One day I want to drive as fast as him’.
Carrie’s parents said they would support her racing career as long as she worked hard at school. She was good at most sports, and represented her school as a basketball player. Her teachers said she was a born champion. She spent every spare minute at competitions or sports training, so it wasn’t easy for her to do her homework, but she managed to make some progress in most subjects.
When she was seventeen Carrie moved on to full-size racing cars. Although it was clear that she was going to have a great future in the sport as a professional driver, she would need to have some help with money if she wanted to continue in the long term. When she left school, her father gave up his job so that he could train her. Before long, Carrie started winning championships and one team called her with an offer, but she decided she wasn’t ready.
Carrie is only 23, but is becoming well know. The cars she drives are getting faster, and she’s competing against people who have been driving much longer than her. She makes money from her successes, and her father is now her full-time manager. She needs him to look after her in a tough profession.
In spite of her success, Carrie admits she still has a lot to do. ‘I watch the great drivers, and read about them’, she says. ‘Some people blame the car if they lose a race, but I know for me it’s usually because I do something wrong. When I make mistakes, I think about them and discuss them with my trainer. That’s the only way forward.’.
According to the second paragraph, Carrie hoped

 
 
 

13. Racing Driver
Carrie Wilson became a racing driver when she was six years old. She was given a radio-controlled car for her birthday. She entered competitions with it and finished second in a national championship the following year. She was proud that she was winning races against adults. She loved the excitement of travelling to events, and her father thought that she had a natural talent for motor sport.
The next thing Carrie tried was racing go – karts – miniature cars with engines. She was given a go-kart for her eighth birthday and she won races in different countries. On her tenth birthday, she was given a picture of the famous Brazilian 1970s Formula One champion Emerson Fittipaldi and told her parents, ‘One day I want to drive as fast as him’.
Carrie’s parents said they would support her racing career as long as she worked hard at school. She was good at most sports, and represented her school as a basketball player. Her teachers said she was a born champion. She spent every spare minute at competitions or sports training, so it wasn’t easy for her to do her homework, but she managed to make some progress in most subjects.
When she was seventeen Carrie moved on to full-size racing cars. Although it was clear that she was going to have a great future in the sport as a professional driver, she would need to have some help with money if she wanted to continue in the long term. When she left school, her father gave up his job so that he could train her. Before long, Carrie started winning championships and one team called her with an offer, but she decided she wasn’t ready.
Carrie is only 23, but is becoming well know. The cars she drives are getting faster, and she’s competing against people who have been driving much longer than her. She makes money from her successes, and her father is now her full-time manager. She needs him to look after her in a tough profession.
In spite of her success, Carrie admits she still has a lot to do. ‘I watch the great drivers, and read about them’, she says. ‘Some people blame the car if they lose a race, but I know for me it’s usually because I do something wrong. When I make mistakes, I think about them and discuss them with my trainer. That’s the only way forward.’.
What does the third paragraph say about Carrie’s time at school?

 
 
 

14. Racing Driver
Carrie Wilson became a racing driver when she was six years old. She was given a radio-controlled car for her birthday. She entered competitions with it and finished second in a national championship the following year. She was proud that she was winning races against adults. She loved the excitement of travelling to events, and her father thought that she had a natural talent for motor sport.
The next thing Carrie tried was racing go – karts – miniature cars with engines. She was given a go-kart for her eighth birthday and she won races in different countries. On her tenth birthday, she was given a picture of the famous Brazilian 1970s Formula One champion Emerson Fittipaldi and told her parents, ‘One day I want to drive as fast as him’.
Carrie’s parents said they would support her racing career as long as she worked hard at school. She was good at most sports, and represented her school as a basketball player. Her teachers said she was a born champion. She spent every spare minute at competitions or sports training, so it wasn’t easy for her to do her homework, but she managed to make some progress in most subjects.
When she was seventeen Carrie moved on to full-size racing cars. Although it was clear that she was going to have a great future in the sport as a professional driver, she would need to have some help with money if she wanted to continue in the long term. When she left school, her father gave up his job so that he could train her. Before long, Carrie started winning championships and one team called her with an offer, but she decided she wasn’t ready.
Carrie is only 23, but is becoming well know. The cars she drives are getting faster, and she’s competing against people who have been driving much longer than her. She makes money from her successes, and her father is now her full-time manager. She needs him to look after her in a tough profession.
In spite of her success, Carrie admits she still has a lot to do. ‘I watch the great drivers, and read about them’, she says. ‘Some people blame the car if they lose a race, but I know for me it’s usually because I do something wrong. When I make mistakes, I think about them and discuss them with my trainer. That’s the only way forward.’.
What happened as soon as Carrie left school?

 
 
 

15. Racing Driver
Carrie Wilson became a racing driver when she was six years old. She was given a radio-controlled car for her birthday. She entered competitions with it and finished second in a national championship the following year. She was proud that she was winning races against adults. She loved the excitement of travelling to events, and her father thought that she had a natural talent for motor sport.
The next thing Carrie tried was racing go – karts – miniature cars with engines. She was given a go-kart for her eighth birthday and she won races in different countries. On her tenth birthday, she was given a picture of the famous Brazilian 1970s Formula One champion Emerson Fittipaldi and told her parents, ‘One day I want to drive as fast as him’.
Carrie’s parents said they would support her racing career as long as she worked hard at school. She was good at most sports, and represented her school as a basketball player. Her teachers said she was a born champion. She spent every spare minute at competitions or sports training, so it wasn’t easy for her to do her homework, but she managed to make some progress in most subjects.
When she was seventeen Carrie moved on to full-size racing cars. Although it was clear that she was going to have a great future in the sport as a professional driver, she would need to have some help with money if she wanted to continue in the long term. When she left school, her father gave up his job so that he could train her. Before long, Carrie started winning championships and one team called her with an offer, but she decided she wasn’t ready.
Carrie is only 23, but is becoming well know. The cars she drives are getting faster, and she’s competing against people who have been driving much longer than her. She makes money from her successes, and her father is now her full-time manager. She needs him to look after her in a tough profession.
In spite of her success, Carrie admits she still has a lot to do. ‘I watch the great drivers, and read about them’, she says. ‘Some people blame the car if they lose a race, but I know for me it’s usually because I do something wrong. When I make mistakes, I think about them and discuss them with my trainer. That’s the only way forward.’.
What does the fifth paragraph say about Carrie’s situation now?

 
 
 

16. Racing Driver
Carrie Wilson became a racing driver when she was six years old. She was given a radio-controlled car for her birthday. She entered competitions with it and finished second in a national championship the following year. She was proud that she was winning races against adults. She loved the excitement of travelling to events, and her father thought that she had a natural talent for motor sport.
The next thing Carrie tried was racing go – karts – miniature cars with engines. She was given a go-kart for her eighth birthday and she won races in different countries. On her tenth birthday, she was given a picture of the famous Brazilian 1970s Formula One champion Emerson Fittipaldi and told her parents, ‘One day I want to drive as fast as him’.
Carrie’s parents said they would support her racing career as long as she worked hard at school. She was good at most sports, and represented her school as a basketball player. Her teachers said she was a born champion. She spent every spare minute at competitions or sports training, so it wasn’t easy for her to do her homework, but she managed to make some progress in most subjects.
When she was seventeen Carrie moved on to full-size racing cars. Although it was clear that she was going to have a great future in the sport as a professional driver, she would need to have some help with money if she wanted to continue in the long term. When she left school, her father gave up his job so that he could train her. Before long, Carrie started winning championships and one team called her with an offer, but she decided she wasn’t ready.
Carrie is only 23, but is becoming well know. The cars she drives are getting faster, and she’s competing against people who have been driving much longer than her. She makes money from her successes, and her father is now her full-time manager. She needs him to look after her in a tough profession.
In spite of her success, Carrie admits she still has a lot to do. ‘I watch the great drivers, and read about them’, she says. ‘Some people blame the car if they lose a race, but I know for me it’s usually because I do something wrong. When I make mistakes, I think about them and discuss them with my trainer. That’s the only way forward.’.
In the final paragraph, what does Carrie say about her progress?

 
 
 

17. Even though there were a lot of people at the party next door, there wasn’t __________ noise.

 
 
 
 

18. Dina __________have gone to the concert if she had not felt so tired.

 
 
 
 

19. Sam __________to play for the local football team next year.

 
 
 
 

20. Helena suggested __________out for a meal.

 
 
 
 

21. She kindly offered to __________ me the way to the station.

 
 
 
 

22. It was __________ an exciting football match that the fans ran on to the pitch.

 
 
 
 

23. The special deal is only valid until the end of the week, so __________ advantage of it while you can..

 
 
 
 

24. My family __________ of six people.

 
 
 
 

25. Advertisements are required not to give a misleading __________ .

 
 
 
 

26. I applied for a very interesting job but was turned __________ .

 
 
 
 

27. I don’t need to know the whole story, just give me the __________ .

 
 
 
 

28. All the children enjoyed going to school __________ from Harry.

 
 
 
 

29. Although she was __________ disappointed to lose the game, she didn’t show it.

 
 
 
 

30. By the time the guests arrived, the chef __________ cooking. So the timing was perfect!

 
 
 
 

31. They __________ for seven hours before a car stopped and gave them a ride.

 
 
 
 

32. My company is relocating, so by this time next year __________ in Lisbon.

 
 
 
 

33. Oh my god! Your baby is __________!

 
 
 
 

34. __________ it was going to offend him, I wouldn’t have said anything.

 
 
 
 

35. __________ as a tour guide for three years now, I can pretty much tell you all about this city.

 
 
 
 

36. __________ did we know that swarms of starving mosquitoes had the power to do so.

 
 
 
 

37. __________ had we arrived, it seemed, than we had to leave.

 
 
 
 

38. As the Ice Age advanced and forests __________ away, many herbivores were compelled to change their diets from leaves to grass.

 
 
 
 

39. Although Ray Charles was an inspiring collaborator, he could also be described as a __________ figure.

 
 
 
 

40. Sally was __________ of quitting her job when they agreed to give her a raise in the end.

 
 
 
 

Question 1 of 40